Jordanian Cuisine (Part 2)

In the last few days, I have just posted about 6 dishes of Jordanian Cuisine, and here is the  continuation for the part 1:-

Let’s get started.

1.Galayet Bandora

One of the other common dishes we have in Jordan is ” galayet bandora “, also known just as galayet. This dish includes tomatoes which are stewed until soft and pureed, with a few seasonings like garlic, olive oil, and salt. The tartness and sweetness of the tomatoes is what really shines, and it tastes great scooped up with bread ore eaten with rice.


You also can try this type of galayet with meat, so it is kind of chunky tomato sauce with cubes of beef, eaten with rice.

2. Warak Enab and Kousa Mahshi

Warak enab, or stuffed grape leaves, and kousa mahshi, which are stuffed zucchini, can sometimes be served together, and they are another fantastic addition to Jordanian cuisine. Versions of this dish are commonly eaten throughout the Middle East and Mediterranean.

Both the grape leaves and the zucchini are stuffed with a combination of rice and ground meat, onions, and light seasonings, then wrapped up, and slow cooked. When you are in Jordan , you will find that it is usually served cold and with a sour taste from pickled grape leaves. But the best version that you may find it is a home-made meal, where both the grape leaf rolls and stuffed zucchini were cooked with lamb ribs and fat. The rolls were melt-in-your-mouth soft, and had soaked up all the lamb juices.


3.Ful Medames

When you visit Jordan you will find ful medames on the streets of Jordan, it’s like go-to street food you will enjoy “ful” immensely. And really you will have an awesome feelings while eating “ful”, this dish of mashed fava beans and olive oil, is also widely available and commonly eaten throughout Jordan. You’ll find ful at most restaurants that serve hummus and falafel.

The favorite way to eat ful is sprinkled with some powdered cumin and chili powder, drizzled in olive oil, and scooped up with either bites of bread or with wedges of onion. The fava beans taste very similar to Mexican refried beans. When you are in Jordan you will love eating ful medames for breakfast, along with some hummus and fresh raw vegetables.

4.Chicken Liver

Commonly served as a mezze dish, along with dishes like hummus and moutabel, chicken livers is another fantastic Jordanian dish to complement your meal. The chicken livers are typically sautéed in olive oil with just a few simple seasonings like garlic, parsley, and salt, and then sprinkled with some lemon juice.

Liver is not everyone’s favorite part of the chicken, but I would say that you’ve got to give them a chance. If you are not a huge fan of chicken live, just give them a try you will love it until you become a huge fan fan of chicken liver😉, this tactic works;  A piece of bread, with a liver, and some hummus, is an wonderful combination bite.👍🙂.


5.Kaek Bread Sandwich

One of the most popular Jordanian street food snacks, especially common in the morning, is a kaek bread sandwich. The bread, which is in the shape of a mini personal loaf, is topped in a crust of sesame seeds, and can be filled with Happy Cow like triangles of cheese, hard baked eggs, za’atar, and chili sauce. It’s simple, tasty, and very common.

Kaek sandwiches taste the best when they are piping hot – when the bread is cooked fresh. If you visit Amman, there’s a lot of bakeries which it sells this type of bread. but it serves one of the best sesame bread sandwiches in the city. Grab a fresh loaf, add all the toppings your self, and take a bite of one of the most incredible loaves of kaek in Jordan.👌

6. Kibbeh Bi Laban

Kibbeh are little deep fried nuggets of minced meat, onions, and spices, wrapped in a crust of bulgar wheat, and deep fried until golden crispy on the outside. The dish is commonly eaten on its own, or as a mezze dish or snack, along with a variety of different dishes like hummus or moutabel.
But for kibbeh bi laban, after the kibbeh are done being prepared, they are then cooked in a yoghurt sauce, which not only transforms their taste and texture, but also turns them more into a main dish as opposed to a snack. enjoy kibbeh when you visit Jordan in all its forms, 😉both plain, and cooked with laban yoghurt sauce.🙂

To be continued…

Thanks for reading.

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35 thoughts on “Jordanian Cuisine (Part 2)

  1. Wow!!
    That is soooo fantastic and delicious …
    We are similar in making food exept for kebba with laban..we took it from you.
    اتمنى لكم افطارا شهيا وصوما مقبولا
    جوعتنى يا حسين بهذه الاطباق الشهية هههه
    Best wishes!!

    Liked by 3 people

  2. I love the first dish and may end up trying to make that! You’ve inspired me!

    I had the privilege of having some Iraqi cuisine here in Portland the other day. I trust many of the dishes are the same?

    Thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Wow, love to hear that from you, actually Arabic food is not all the time we put hot spicy. Have you tried shwarma is the most popular dish in Europe and the middle East as well.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Liver, foul and Homos I always fall in love. If you give me everyday I will take it everyday 💓💓💓💓💓💓💗💗💗💗💗💗💗💖💖💖💖💖💓💓💓💓💓💓💓💓💓💗💗💗💖💖💖💖💖💗💓💓💗💓💞💞💞💝💝💟💟💟💟

    That much I love all of them

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Aslam Aleikum, Maalem!
      Good to see you again across this post.
      Hope you doing well!
      Yes, it is irresistible, and when you see these dishes, you will not have the power for passing it up. As I believe, there are enormous number of rest. Sell these things in KSA. 😃

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Syrian can make it well , Ramadan is making you busy, I know that. Now we are almost in the last ten nights of Ramadan, may Allah accept our fasting and make us with Ahl Jannah.

        Like

      2. But for me , can recognize the taste and what nationality cooked it, lazem ” taam good” not “daam good” it is in T letter. Sorry of I bother you within the correction.maalem☺️

        Liked by 1 person

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